Delaware Chancery Court Strikes Another Blow Against “Disclosure-Only” Settlements

By: Mark J. Tarallo

MJT Headshot Photo 2015 (M0846615xB1386)In a decision issued on January 22, 2016, in In re Trulia, Inc. Stockholder Litig., (“Trulia”), the Delaware Chancery Court struck another blow against “disclosure-only” settlements.  In Trulia, Chancellor Andre Bouchard rejected a proposed disclosure-only settlement and in a strongly worded opinion stated that “the Court’s historical predisposition toward approving disclosure settlements needs to be reexamined,” and that the Chancery Court would be “increasingly vigilant in scrutinizing the “give” and the “get” of such settlements to ensure that they are genuinely fair and reasonable to the absent class members.”

Disclosure-only settlements are common in litigation arising out of M&A transactions.  As Chancellor Bouchard noted:

“It has become the most common method for quickly resolving stockholder lawsuits that are filed routinely in response to the announcement of virtually every transaction involving the acquisition of a public corporation. In essence, Trulia agreed to supplement the proxy materials disseminated to its stockholders before they voted on the proposed transaction to include some additional information that theoretically would allow the stockholders to be better informed in exercising their franchise rights. In exchange, plaintiffs dropped their motion to preliminarily enjoin the transaction and agreed to provide a release of claims on behalf of a proposed class of Trulia’s stockholders. If approved, the settlement will not provide Trulia stockholders with any economic benefits. The only money that would change hands is the payment of a fee to plaintiffs’ counsel.”

In rejecting the settlement, Chancellor Bouchard ruled that “from the perspective of Trulia’s stockholders, the “get” in the form of the Supplemental Disclosures does not provide adequate consideration to warrant the “give” of providing a release of claims to defendants and their affiliates, in the form submitted or otherwise.” The Trulia ruling may signal the end of such settlements in Delaware.  The full text of the opinion can be found here.

For more information, please contact Mark Tarallo.

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